Studio methods

A gift of Kangaroo paw roots

Kangaroo paw roots and rue on wool fabric

Cut up Kangaroo Paw roots, some leaves, and rue sprigs on wool fabric

Hastily made into a multi-layered bundle and, with a smaller silk bundle, put on the fire:

pot on the fire

Smoke gets in your eyes: the old plough-disk barbie.

Now, the hardest part – resisting temptation and waiting before unwrapping.

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Wire lace

Another assignment is completed and installed.  It was a process of trial & error, and very low tech (papier mache & wire).

Completed bird-netting armature, before papering over.

Upright armature, overlapping layers of netting.

Testing the paper-covered form on site.

Starting the first panel of wire lace.

By the time I’d done the seventh panel, I’d worked out how to control the tangle.  Next time, I will do fewer, wider panels.

First wire lace panel completed.

Completed wire lace, resting.

Installed under the sheoaks at Gomboc.

Gomboc Sculpture Park and Gallery is in Middle Swan, and the annual sculpture survey opens on June 6th.

Catching up with R

Monogrammed hanky with extra embroidery in progress

Looking for a distraction, and needing to stitch, I delved into the bag of materials and samples from John Parkes’ July workshop (see this link and scroll to the bottom).  I had left the top R pinned, without stitching, as the fine brass pins looked beautiful with the transparent fabrics.  But now I’m going to stitch, both around the reverse appliqué and into the whole cloth.

The hanky was a gift, the red fabric is thick wool cloth salvaged from my old dressing gown and there is also part of a favourite linen shirt and a fraying silk scarf.  The colour and thickness of the red wool argues with the other materials, which feels appropriate right now.